History

 Ray Berg

Lager, Lymph, Germans and Templars in Manchester—Part 6 of 6

by Ray Berg and Alan Dyer   By 1905, the national “wet vs. dry” debate was fully underway. A “local option” campaign was advocated by the Anti-Saloon League to allow individual cities or counties to express their choice. In the spring of 1909, both Jackson and Lenawee counties voted to go dry, as did several […]

 Ray Berg

Lager, Lymph, Germans and Templars in Manchester–Part 5 of 6

by Ray Berg and Alan Dyer Introduction Parts 1 through 4 of this series discussed the political and cultural conflicts which developed in Manchester due to the influx of German immigrants to the village following the Civil War. The Germans’ need for lager beer led to the opening of the Michigan Southern Brewery in 1872, […]

 fgs@umich.edu

Lager, Lymph, Germans and Templars in Manchester — Part 4 of 6

by Ray Berg and Alan Dyer Continuing with the story of the Michigan Southern Brewery in Manchester and the opposing temperance and prohibition movements… John Koch The Michigan Southern Brewery was taken over by John Koch in late 1884. Koch was born in 1840 in Ulm, Bavaria, and emigrated to Detroit in 1865. He established […]

 Ray Berg

Lager, Lymph, Germans and Templars in Manchester — Part 3 of 6

by Ray Berg and Alan Dyer   Introduction In the first two parts of this series, we discussed the influx of German immigrants and their rise to economic and political power in Manchester Village in the post-Civil War period. A second area of examination was that of “nativism,” a movement that viewed these immigrants as […]

 fgs@umich.edu

Lager, Lymph, Germans and Templars in Manchester — Part 2 of 6

by Ray Berg and Alan Dyer The Templars Arise The opening of breweries, distilleries and saloons in Manchester led to the growth of both the “temperance” movement, which sought to educate the public and reduce alcoholic beverage usage and its subsequent abuses, and the “prohibition” movement, which sought the outright banning of alcohol as a […]

 Ray Berg

Lager, Lymph, Germans and Templars in Manchester — Part 1 of 6

by Ray Berg and Alan Dyer Introduction In previous articles, we noted the post-Civil War economic boom in Michigan that caused a renewed demand for consumer goods and led to higher commodity prices, conditions that benefited both farmers and merchants.  A second railroad in 1870 opened Manchester to new markets, especially those in Indiana and […]

 Ray Berg

The Bank of Manchester – Speculation, Boom and Bust in the 1830s (Part Two of Two)

The Short Life of the Bank of Manchester by Ray Berg and Alan Dyer It quickly became apparent by late 1837 that multiple cases of specie fraud were occurring at various banks. The same specie (i.e., exact same combination of gold and silver coin denominations) was being noted at different banks. In some cases, paper […]

 Ray Berg

The Bank of Manchester – Speculation, Boom and Bust in the 1830s (Part One of Two)

by Ray Berg and Alan Dyer Introduction In previous articles, we have seen the influence of the Fargo brothers, Stephen, James and Alonzo, in the early development of commerce and government in Manchester Village. The brothers opened the first general store on August 21, 1833, and James Fargo served in organizing Manchester Township as its […]

 fgs@umich.edu

The First National Memorial Day Speech, Given by James Garfield in May of 1868

Editor’s Note: The graves of the sacred dead have been decorated for tens of thousands of years, and markers honoring those who have fallen in battle are as old as battle itself. But our national holiday called Memorial Day started shortly after the American Civil War. 620,000 Americans, measured at 2% of the total population, […]

 fgs@umich.edu

Shopping in Downtown Manchester Circa 1835 – at Fargo & Fargo! Part Two of Two

by Ray Berg   The Fargo Path to Manchester Our Fargo brothers descended from a large family whose ancestry is well documented on the Internet back to France (Jacent Fargeau, born about 1622). Moses Fargo, the first immigrant, landed in Connecticut in 1668, and our part of the extended family eventually made its way to […]